CSS animation-play-state Property

Hey there fellow programmers!

The animation-play-state property in CSS is a useful tool that allows you to control the state of an animation. It can be used to pause or resume an animation that is currently running, giving you more control over how your animations behave.

One of the main use cases for the animation-play-state property is to pause an animation when it’s not in the viewport. This can help to improve the performance of your website by only running animations when they are visible to the user. For example, let’s say you have an animation that runs on scroll, and you want to pause the animation when the user scrolls out of the viewport. Here’s an example of how you might do that:

.animated-element {
  animation: slideIn 2s infinite;
  animation-play-state: paused;
}
const animatedElement = document.querySelector('.animated-element');

window.addEventListener('scroll', () => {
  const bounding = animatedElement.getBoundingClientRect();
  if (
    bounding.top >= 0 &&
    bounding.left >= 0 &&
    bounding.right <= (window.innerWidth || document.documentElement.clientWidth) &&
    bounding.bottom <= (window.innerHeight || document.documentElement.clientHeight)
  ) {
    animatedElement.style.animationPlayState = 'running';
  } else {
    animatedElement.style.animationPlayState = 'paused';
  }
});

In this example, we’re using JavaScript to listen for the scroll event, and we’re using the getBoundingClientRect method to check if the animated element is within the viewport. If it is, we set the animation-play-state property to running, which will cause the animation to start running. If it’s not, we set the animation-play-state property to paused, which will cause the animation to pause.

Another use case for the animation-play-state property is to create interactive animations that can be controlled by the user. For example, you can use the animation-play-state property to create a button that can pause and resume an animation when clicked. Here’s an example of how you might do that:

<button id="play-pause-button">Pause</button>
<div class="animated-element">
  <!-- animation content here -->
</div>
.animated-element {
  animation: slideIn 2s infinite;
}
const playPauseButton = document.getElementById('play-pause-button');
const animatedElement = document.querySelector('.animated-element');

playPauseButton.addEventListener('click', () => {
  if (animatedElement.style.animationPlayState === 'running') {
    animatedElement.style.animationPlayState = 'paused';
    playPauseButton.textContent = 'Play';
  } else {
    animatedElement.style.animationPlayState = 'running';
    playPauseButton.textContent = 'Pause';
  }
});

In this example, we have a button with an ID of “play-pause-button” and a div element with a class of “animated-element” which has an animation applied to it. When the user clicks the button, we use JavaScript to check the current value of the animation-play-state property. If it’s set to running, we set it to paused and change the text of the button to “Play”. If it’s set to paused, we set it to running and change the text of the button to “Pause”.

It’s also worth noting that the animation-play-state property can accept two values, paused and running. The default value is running, so if you don’t specify a value, the animation will start running automatically when the page loads.

In conclusion, the animation-play-state property is a useful tool that allows you to control the state of an animation. It can be used to pause or resume an animation that is currently running, giving you more control over how your animations behave. You can use it to improve the performance of your website by only running animations when they are visible to the user, or to create interactive animations that can be controlled by the user.

Keep in mind that the animation-play-state property only affects the animation, it does not stop or start the animation, for that you should use animation-iteration-count and animation-direction properties. Happy coding!

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

CSS all Property

As a front-end developer, it’s important to have a solid understanding of all the CSS properties available to…